Articles Posted in Marketing & Innovation


Live Innovation

Innovation is a cornerstone of success. Building on that, the Ipsos office in Vancouver recently hosted its own Knowledge Summit on July 17 at the Vancouver Marriott Pinnacle Downtown Hotel. The event – It’s Cool to be Innovative – showcased tips, techniques, and cool research methodologies in terms of customer understanding, and taking brand and business success to the next level.

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The Groupon Phenomenon

Within CPG, the impact of so-called “daily deals” today really rests on their ability to impact traditional marketing drivers such as awareness, distribution, trial and repeat.   At a minimum a service like Groupon can be used to launch new products, induce trial, and create another distribution channel.  Beyond that, if these services can truly be made to be social (though such examples are few at this point), the value increases exponentially. So experiment now.  But do start with an end objective in mind, like you would with any marketing initiative.

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Building Reputation in Higher Education

In a paper published today by Ipsos Public Affairs explains how higher education institutions can utilize research to understand the higher education landscape, define their unique brand, profile potential students and build and communicate their reputation to key target audiences.

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A Greener ‘Vision’ for BC Marketers?

Ipsos Reid’s Carmen Chan will be joining a number of her colleagues at today’s BCAMA Vision Conference in Vancouver – an event proudly sponsored by Ipsos. No doubt, some of BC’s biggest marketers will be there. How are those retail marketers doing at greening up their reputations? Carmen wrote about that very topic for the BCAMA’s Marketline publication. And we have a posting about her article, including a list of the Top 10 Mentioned Environmentally-Friendly Retailers in BC found in a recent Ipsos Reid study on retailers and the environment.

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The Importance of Face Time

In planning for this year’s summit, we considered not holding an in-person event, but to conduct it all virtually via webinar.  After all, it’s easier and cheaper for everyone to hold events virtually, right?  I bounced this idea off of a few clients who have attended these events in the past and I got the same response – “Oh, we really like these events and being able to meet and see everyone in person.”  And so we went forward in planning a live, in-person event.  This year’s summit ended up being the best to-date (we say this every year, so it really does just keep getting better).  And along the way, we learned some valuable lessons on the importance of live contact and communication.

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The Customer Experience Show

Earlier this week, my colleague Tim Keiningham and I were interviewed on The Customer Experience Show hosted by BlogTalkRadio. Tim talked about his award winning and Harvard Business Review published work on The Wallet Allocation Rule. I provided color commentary and fielded questions from the three hosts of The Customer Experience Show. I just listened to the show (it’s always a little scary hearing your own voice!) and was surprised at just how simple and yet powerful Wallet Allocation concepts come across. And it was pleasantly surprising to hear the hosts tell us that our interview was one of the most impressive of the 70+ they have conducted on the show!

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Seattle Knowledge Summit 2012: Collaborate, Integrate & Innovate – Moving from Data to Insights

We’ve been planning this one for a while and the day is finally here! Our 2012 Seattle Knowledge Summit. The Pacific Northwest is known for its natural beauty and quality lifestyle but it is also home to some of the most innovative and forward-thinking companies in America. What better way to connect with Seattle-area marketers than with a Knowledge Summit themed on collaboration, integration and innovation – its what we’re known for in this region.

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Examining Shifts in Public Opinion: Global Warming Policy Trends 2010-2012

Jon Krosnick is a frequent collaborator with Ipsos Public Affairs on methodological and public opinion issues. Prof. Krosnick is University Fellow at Resources for the Future and a professor of communications, political science and psychology at Stanford University. This post is as a guest contributor discussing the implications of the recently released research found here

Our research team at Stanford has been tracking American public opinion on global warming since the mid-1990s, and Americans’ views on this issue have changed much like people’s views on other political issues change over time: slowly.  The civil rights movement led to a change in public attitudes about race, but the change happened gradually.  Likewise, the public health community convinced Americans that smoking cigarettes is dangerous to human health, but again, the proportion of people endorsing this view grew slowly over decades.  Despite tremendous amounts of public discussion and debate about whether global warming is real and a threat during the last decade and a half, the proportions of Americans who have expressed various opinions on the issue have remained remarkably consistent.

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Writing Concepts As If Guided by Voices

If a successful company like P&G – with a claimed 50% success rate for new products, versus an industry average of 15-20% – spends eight years developing Tide Pods, don’t our good ideas deserve just a bit more nurturing than we are giving them?  A good idea, poorly executed, will fail – same as a poor idea, well executed.  A successful concept requires both a good idea and proper execution.  Success of this nature can absolutely happen on a deadline, but it’s less likely to happen if you procrastinate right up until the deadline.

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Database Follies

As with the review website Metacritic, the static database problem runs rampant in Market Research, if you look for it – inherent in any rating where we ask people for a monadic evaluation without understanding current behavior and competitive context. Whether in CPG or other areas of life, the question isn’t whether you like something – it’s whether it would replace what you are currently doing. Next time you go to conduct a Market Research study, ask yourself these two questions.  (1)  Did I start by understanding current consumer behavior?  (2)  Did I force consumers to make a choice within a competitive context, by comparing to their current behavior?  If the answer to either of these questions is “no,” you might end up with the Metacritic problem.  Unless it turns out you truly do live in Lake Wobegon, and all your ideas are above average.

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