Articles Posted in Innovation

Great Ideas = Great New Products, Right? Wrong!

Successful innovation is more than just coming up with great new product ideas.  And innovation strategy is more than a series of ideation sessions.  Great new products don’t just come from great new ideas.  Rather, they often come from learnings … Read More…

Listen Up: Beats Audio Accelerates Innovation to Become a Billion-Dollar Business

Did you hear that?  Did you hear the voice of the consumer singing a sweet song about their needs, dreams and desires?  Rapper/producer Dr. Dre and record mogul Jimmy Iovine heard it, and they crafted it into their latest hit: … Read More…

The Innovator’s Dilemma

With a nod to the Clayton Christensen book of the same name, I wanted to revisit the concept of the innovator’s dilemma from the perspective of marketing research.  I do this on the heels of attending the recent Edison Awards (a combination awards ceremony … Read More…

Is Your Research Letting Store Brands Win?

Once upon a time, store brands were considered cheap, generic, inferior – what you would buy when you are on a budget or seeking a bargain. These days, that fairy tale is over. Store brands and private labels have become … Read More…

Scare Tactics

If companies put half the innovation and creativity into their regular process that they put into Halloween (or Easter, for that matter) in and outs we would be awash in mind-blowing new products.  This is what happens when you remove some of the typical ROI constraints in which companies are awash – you end up actually generating ideas that leap over those constraints, and create a category that is growing rapidly rather than one that is cost-reducing itself to death.

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Taking A Holiday Pulse

The holidays are the biggest sales season of the year – I know that personally by the line-ups I’ve stood in to see the smile on my kids’ faces come Christmas morning. But as a researcher, I also know that … Read More…

31% of Democrats are conservative! Party ID, Voting Intention, and the political makeup of samples

Ipsos has been getting a lot of questions lately about the political makeup of polls. This is normal towards the end of an election cycle – lots of people scrutinize the polls a lot more closely! We welcome the discussions, and it offers us an opportunity to help people better understand what makes up a quality political poll.

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Live Innovation

Innovation is a cornerstone of success. Building on that, the Ipsos office in Vancouver recently hosted its own Knowledge Summit on July 17 at the Vancouver Marriott Pinnacle Downtown Hotel. The event – It’s Cool to be Innovative – showcased tips, techniques, and cool research methodologies in terms of customer understanding, and taking brand and business success to the next level.

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The Groupon Phenomenon

Within CPG, the impact of so-called “daily deals” today really rests on their ability to impact traditional marketing drivers such as awareness, distribution, trial and repeat.   At a minimum a service like Groupon can be used to launch new products, induce trial, and create another distribution channel.  Beyond that, if these services can truly be made to be social (though such examples are few at this point), the value increases exponentially. So experiment now.  But do start with an end objective in mind, like you would with any marketing initiative.

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Examining Shifts in Public Opinion: Global Warming Policy Trends 2010-2012

Jon Krosnick is a frequent collaborator with Ipsos Public Affairs on methodological and public opinion issues. Prof. Krosnick is University Fellow at Resources for the Future and a professor of communications, political science and psychology at Stanford University. This post is as a guest contributor discussing the implications of the recently released research found here

Our research team at Stanford has been tracking American public opinion on global warming since the mid-1990s, and Americans’ views on this issue have changed much like people’s views on other political issues change over time: slowly.  The civil rights movement led to a change in public attitudes about race, but the change happened gradually.  Likewise, the public health community convinced Americans that smoking cigarettes is dangerous to human health, but again, the proportion of people endorsing this view grew slowly over decades.  Despite tremendous amounts of public discussion and debate about whether global warming is real and a threat during the last decade and a half, the proportions of Americans who have expressed various opinions on the issue have remained remarkably consistent.

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