Chris Jackson
About Chris Jackson Vice President
Ipsos Public Affairs
Chris.Jackson@ipsos.com

Chris Jackson is a Vice President with Ipsos Public Affairs, working in public opinion research since 2005. Chris specializes in Political Polling and strategic communications research with an emphasis on managing multi-country surveys among consumers and elite stakeholders. During his time at Ipsos he has conducted research for major corporations in the aviation, information technology, finance and consumer products industries. Before joining Ipsos he worked in non-profit and public policy research and prior to that he worked in national politics.

Articles by Chris Jackson


Examining Shifts in Public Opinion: Global Warming Policy Trends 2010-2012

Jon Krosnick is a frequent collaborator with Ipsos Public Affairs on methodological and public opinion issues. Prof. Krosnick is University Fellow at Resources for the Future and a professor of communications, political science and psychology at Stanford University. This post is as a guest contributor discussing the implications of the recently released research found here

Our research team at Stanford has been tracking American public opinion on global warming since the mid-1990s, and Americans’ views on this issue have changed much like people’s views on other political issues change over time: slowly.  The civil rights movement led to a change in public attitudes about race, but the change happened gradually.  Likewise, the public health community convinced Americans that smoking cigarettes is dangerous to human health, but again, the proportion of people endorsing this view grew slowly over decades.  Despite tremendous amounts of public discussion and debate about whether global warming is real and a threat during the last decade and a half, the proportions of Americans who have expressed various opinions on the issue have remained remarkably consistent.

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Obama’s economy

On some of the most crucial attributes, including jobs and the economy, healthcare and representing change, Barack Obama was seen by the majority of Americans as the most credible candidate. Unfortunately for the President, this path looks like it probably will not work twice.

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Consumer Confidence and the Election

As Cliff pointed out in his earlier post Barack Obama’s chances for reelection are more reliant on the sentiment of the American Public (desire for change vs desire for continuity) than the tactics of the campaign. In upcoming posts, Cliff will further detail how he calculates the desire for change typology. Today I wanted to share some quick data on a single component, the economy and consumer confidence.

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