Chris Jackson
About Chris Jackson Vice President
Ipsos Public Affairs
Chris.Jackson@ipsos.com

Chris Jackson is a Vice President with Ipsos Public Affairs, working in public opinion research since 2005. Chris specializes in Political Polling and strategic communications research with an emphasis on managing multi-country surveys among consumers and elite stakeholders. During his time at Ipsos he has conducted research for major corporations in the aviation, information technology, finance and consumer products industries. Before joining Ipsos he worked in non-profit and public policy research and prior to that he worked in national politics.

Articles by Chris Jackson


Likely voter models and projecting turnout

Returning to the Ipsos approach to likely voters, we have set up a method that allows us fine grained control over our model to match the actual turnout rates (here, here and here). Of course, the perceptive polling connoisseur would ask, “great you can match to turnout, how do you know what turnout is going…

Read More...

2016 Turnout Projection – May 2015 Edition

Now that we have a model allowing us to forecast turnout for upcoming U.S. elections (link), what does our data tell us about the 2016 contest? In our way-too-early projection, the Reuters/Ipsos poll data for May 2015 indicates that 2016 turnout will be about 50% of the voting age population. With almost 18 months until election…

Read More...

Why Bother with Likely Voters

The Ipsos approach to likely voters involves asking multiple questions, assigning each person a score based on their responses, and reporting on likely voters based on expected turnout… So what? Why do we go to all this trouble to build a sophisticated  (and expensive!) likely voter model? We do it because likely voter model construction…

Read More...

Formulating Likely Voters — Ipsos’ Approach

In the reporting of public opinion, there are few widely-discussed concepts that are as confusing or misunderstood as “likely voters”. Many poll observers think likely voters are a hard and fast classification with clear definitions; this could not be further from the truth. The reality is the construction of likely voter identification is extremely variable…

Read More...

2014 U.S. Elections Recap

Ipsos Public Affairs had a busy 2014 full of electoral research centered around the 2014 U.S. midterm election. In fact, we – in partnership with Thomson Reuters – likely have the most complete electoral research program in the United States today. This post is an overview of our work in 2014,  and the follow-up series…

Read More...

Observations on Healthcare Exchange Enrollment pt.2

With yesterday’s end (1) of the open enrollment period of the Affordable Care Act healthcare exchanges, I thought it might be time to revisit some of the data we’ve collected on the enrollees. One of the most frequently asked questions about the exchanges is “will uninsured and underinsured Americans sign up?” Before the exchanges launched, the…

Read More...

Observations on Healthcare Exchange Enrollment

The biggest question that has surrounded the launch of the Affordable Care Act healthcare exchanges is whether they could attract enough “young invincibles” to make the enterprise financially sustainable. Or, would “adverse selection”  saddle the system with older, sicker customers whose healthcare costs would eventually drive the exchanges out of business? The Obama administration’s release…

Read More...

A, RV, LV (All adults, registered voters, likely voters)? Population effects in public opinion polling

As we count down to the November general election, opinion research outfits (like us) are going to release an ever-increasing number and variety of election poll results. Poll aggregation sites (link) help polling consumers make sense of this barrage of data by presenting the average results of the most recent polls. The running average is supposed to iron-out potential outliers or the idiosyncrasies of any one poll to provide a stable, and accurate, benchmark. However, aggregation sites also combine surveys of differing (though overlapping) populations, specifically all Americans, registered voters and likely voters. Do these different populations have different profiles and could they be systematically skewing the aggregator average?

Read More...

Just cause you lean don’t make you a pushover: Party Identification Measurement in Polling

Party identification, i.e. self-identification as a Republican, Democrat, Independent or something else, is one of the most valuable pieces of information modern electoral pollsters collect about their respondents. Armed with party ID information, we can make pretty accurate guesses about how people feel about issues, what stories will appeal to them and, ultimately, how they will vote. It is an essential poll metric for undertaking any type of socio-political analysis of a population. Some research organizations even use it as a weighting variable. However there are two challenges inherent to measuring party ID: 1) there is no industry-standard, foolproof way of identifying party ID, and 2) there are no “true population” statistics for party ID against which we can benchmark our measurements.

Read More...

Examining Shifts in Public Opinion: Global Warming Policy Trends 2010-2012

Jon Krosnick is a frequent collaborator with Ipsos Public Affairs on methodological and public opinion issues. Prof. Krosnick is University Fellow at Resources for the Future and a professor of communications, political science and psychology at Stanford University. This post is as a guest contributor discussing the implications of the recently released research found here

Our research team at Stanford has been tracking American public opinion on global warming since the mid-1990s, and Americans’ views on this issue have changed much like people’s views on other political issues change over time: slowly.  The civil rights movement led to a change in public attitudes about race, but the change happened gradually.  Likewise, the public health community convinced Americans that smoking cigarettes is dangerous to human health, but again, the proportion of people endorsing this view grew slowly over decades.  Despite tremendous amounts of public discussion and debate about whether global warming is real and a threat during the last decade and a half, the proportions of Americans who have expressed various opinions on the issue have remained remarkably consistent.

Read More...
Page 3 of 4« First...234