Chris Jackson
About Chris Jackson Vice President
Ipsos Public Affairs
Chris.Jackson@ipsos.com

Chris Jackson is a Vice President with Ipsos Public Affairs, working in public opinion research since 2005. Chris specializes in Political Polling and strategic communications research with an emphasis on managing multi-country surveys among consumers and elite stakeholders. During his time at Ipsos he has conducted research for major corporations in the aviation, information technology, finance and consumer products industries. Before joining Ipsos he worked in non-profit and public policy research and prior to that he worked in national politics.

Articles by Chris Jackson


Carson’s Departure Doesn’t Change Much (2016 Republican Primary)

Ben Carson ended his run for the 2016 Republican nomination on Friday, March 4 (link) after briefly surging in polling last fall but winning no primaries this year. His departure comes during repeated calls from the Republican Party leadership for the party to coalesce around a candidate (but Trump). Some hope that without Carson in the race, the ~10% of Republicans (link) still supporting him will move to support one of the establishment candidates like Marco Rubio. Our data indicates that is unlikely to happen.

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Super Tuesday States Poll: Clinton and Trump poised for victories

With Super Tuesday tonight, the battle between the establishment and anti-establishment of the Republican and Democratic contests are coming to a head. On the Republican side, Donald Trump holds a strong position. Can Ted Cruz or Marco Rubio come up with some (surprise) wins to delay Trump’s increasingly likely victory? On the Democratic side, Hillary…

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Impact of 2016 Primaries on Voter Enthusiasm

Our presidential primary system is a unique, complicated and dynamic system that seems to be engineered more for drama than actually selecting a leader. After each contest pundits and candidates battle over who has “momentum” in an effort to both frame the next chapter and fire up supporters. Electoral losses are referred to as “demoralizing losses”, while victories are going to “energize supporters”. Regular political news covers (in very minute detail) the poll gains and losses of the candidates. What is less well studied is how election fortunes affect the enthusiasm of candidates’ supporters. After a big win or tough loss, are people fired up? Or ready to give up?

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Public Reputations of 2016 Presidential Candidates

When discussing contemporary politics, one of the most common questions I get asked is, “what do people see in (Candidate)? I don’t understand how anyone can think he/she would be a good president.” This is usually expressed in an incredulous tone suggesting the speaker is talking about the opposition party. I particularly get this question…

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The rise of Neo-Nativism: Putting Trump into Proper Context

by Cliff Young and Chris Jackson Many argue that Trump’s rise in the polls is nothing but a fluke (link, link, and link); that once the Republican voters come to their senses, a more credible candidate will emerge (link, link, and link).  These people may be right; horse race polls are ephemeral at best this…

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Education levels among U.S. Elected Officials Part Two

By Saide Ashaboglu Last post (link) we discussed how U.S. politicians’ education levels differed from the general population, which yielded an interesting comparison.  Fora second deep dive, we decided to look at differences between the Democratic and Republican parties. The politicians we looked at hold office as Representatives, Senators, and Governors. One question that intrigued…

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2016 Turnout Projection Update – June 2015

In recent posts I’ve outlined how we plan to use our Reuters/Ipsos survey data to forecast turnout for the 2016 presidential election and shown where we stand – with our way too early estimate – as of May 2015. In this post, I’d like to bring in some other proof points, expand our analysis a bit and update our turnout projections.

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Education levels among U.S. Elected Officials

by Saide Ashaboglu It is always fascinating pulling a specific group out of the general population and seeing the terms in which they differ from the overall make-up of the country. After this initial idea was born, we thought looking at the education levels of people who represent us in Federal and State government[1] would…

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Likely voter models and projecting turnout

Returning to the Ipsos approach to likely voters, we have set up a method that allows us fine grained control over our model to match the actual turnout rates (here, here and here). Of course, the perceptive polling connoisseur would ask, “great you can match to turnout, how do you know what turnout is going…

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2016 Turnout Projection – May 2015 Edition

Now that we have a model allowing us to forecast turnout for upcoming U.S. elections (link), what does our data tell us about the 2016 contest? In our way-too-early projection, the Reuters/Ipsos poll data for May 2015 indicates that 2016 turnout will be about 50% of the voting age population. With almost 18 months until election…

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