Americans Familiar with Affordable Care Act are its Strongest Supporters

A unique new study Ipsos/NPR study shows that opinions vary dramatically as does the understanding of key facts

People have opinions. That’s a fact. In the democratic process, citizens express their opinions directly by voting. In a perfect democracy – the democracy many policy makers and pundits think we live in – citizens make those decisions based on the facts in a well-informed, rational way. Voters ideally should understand the issues and then vote in the way that benefits them and advances their views.

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Public Opinion on Healthcare

Healthcare has jumped as a priority with Americans over the last few months as salience on the issue has increased. Since the implementation of ACA and related programs, the insurance non-coverage rate declined from 18.2% to 10.5%. This represents 20 million people. Even with increased coverage, support for the ACA, or Obamacare, is roughly split…

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Widespread Pessimism or Glimmers of Hope? US Consumer Confidence After the 2016 Presidential Election

The 2016 US presidential election can be characterized by widespread discontent with the status quo. Indeed, a supermajority of Americans see the system as broken. And strong majorities across party lines believe that America is on the “wrong track”. However, American consumer confidence has strongly rebounded since the Great Recession (bottomed in 2009), showing especially…

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Attitudes Toward Trade

Americans are most focused on domestic issues: in particular, economy and jobs. A very strong majority of Americans see international trade as an important policy focus. However, they do have serious reservations and believe that the US gets the “short end of the stick” on trade deals. Specifically, they see international trade as a primary…

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Public Opinion’s Agenda and Trump: Economic Growth, Healthcare, Immigration, and Infrastructure

The Trump administration will face a public agenda which is mostly domestic in focus.  The American public’s number one priority is jobs and the economy.  Terrorism as a concern comes in second and is especially important among Republicans. Immigration On immigration, a majority of Americans support Trump’s policy prescriptions as laid out in his Arizona…

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The Election Might Be Crazy, but the Polling Numbers Aren’t

It looks like this absurd and lurid presidential election will remain unpredictable until the end. Between the FBI’s on-again, off-again investigations of Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton’s emails, the “you can do anything” comments from Republican rival Donald Trump—not to mention the unexpected injection of Anthony Weiner’s ongoing sexting habits—it’s hardly surprising that the polls seem…

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Polls aside, the U.S. presidential election is far from a blowout

Two weeks out from Election Day and it looks like the race for the White House is all but over.  However, if it looks like pollsters are increasingly on the wrong side of history (Colombia’s referendum, Brexit, the 2015 British election and the Scottish referendum) it could be because they need to triple and quadruple…

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Public Opinion & The Infrastructure Agenda

Shifting Paradigm Context The system is broken.  America is becoming increasingly polarized. Both parties use framing to push their problems. Why? There are increased immigration pressures with more non-white than white babies born in 2011. There is economic pressure on the middle class. 63% believe they are worse off than their parents.  Infrastructure & Public…

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No, You May Not “Unskew” My Polls: A Refresher

It seems that I need to re-up my 2012 post on “why having unequal numbers of Democrats and Republicans in polls is OK”. I was hoping after the massive failure of the “Unskewing Guy” in 2012 I wouldn’t have to revisit this, but it seems I’m wrong. If the amount of abusive emails and tweets…

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Ipsos/Diane Rehm Show Study of Millennials

The data from the Ipsos/NPR Study of Millennials was released today. For full analysis, please visit Ipsos News and Polls. Younger voters, or Millennials (ages 18-34), are distinct from their older counterparts on a number of dimensions, but strikingly similar on others. In particular, when it comes to differences, younger voters are: More progressive in…

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